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Fort Moultrie covered in snow National Park Service Snow 3/80 FOMO.
Fort Moultrie covered in snow National Park Service Snow 3/80 FOMO.
Snow removal using jeep in Cherokee Orchard road, Gatlinburg, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park In the miscellaneous areas around the shops, at Twin Creeks and Cherokee Orchard, at the Visitor Centers, and at headquarters, the jeep is invaluable because of its mobility and flexibility. Here, the snow that fell during the February 18-20 storm is being cleaned from the Cherokee Orchard road. The jeep can efficiently handle snow up to about 12 inches.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7894, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Foreman III Galbraith unlocking gate under snow, Indian Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Indian Gap. Foreman III Galbraith unlocking gate under snow.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3975, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Plowers plowing the snow road, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Naturally, the individual pieces of equipment have various limitations, and their specific uses match together to produce a unified snow removal operation over the entire range of elevation from Newfound Gap to Oconaluftee and Sugarlands. Here the V-plow pushes the berm back in an effort to widen the cleared roadway. This plow is the bruiser, the heavy-duty unit. It is large enough to handle the heaviest snow accumulation we have been faced with.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7884, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Plowers plowing the snow road, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Naturally, the individual pieces of equipment have various limitations, and their specific uses match together to produce a unified snow removal operation over the entire range of elevation from Newfound Gap to Oconaluftee and Sugarlands. Here the V-plow pushes the berm back in an effort to widen the cleared roadway. This plow is the bruiser, the heavy-duty unit. It is large enough to handle the heaviest snow accumulation we have been faced with.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7885, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Administration Building, Building No. 231, full view from road, early picture, evidently taken soon after planting was done, snow on ground, mountains in background Great Smoky Mountains National Park Full view from edge of lawn. Evidently taken immediately after construction and before any planting was done. Administration Building, Building No. 231, II-B-(1)-1456, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Administrative buildings (ranger stations and outbuildings, warden stations, fire towers, checking stations, Geological Survey gauging stations, possession cabin.
Barn on left and pig pen on right with snow covering ground, Ephram Bales Barn, Roaring Fork, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park The barn at left and pig pen at right are located across roadway from house. Completion report photo.Ephram Bales Barn; Building No. 137, II-B-(5)-3795, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Historic buildings being preserved
Side view of large wooden barn in snow, Junglebrook Barn, Cherokee Orchard Road Great Smoky Mountains National Park Building report photo.Junglebrook Barn; Cherokee Orchard Road; Building No. 133, II-B-(5)-3012, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Historic buildings being preserved
Oshkosh blade plow, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Storms often occur when large accumulations are recorded at high elevations and up to 6 inches fall on the lower slopes. Such was the case from February 18th to 20th. The drag plow, attached to a stake body dump truck, is effective up to a 6-inch accumulation of snow. It frees the larger blade plows for heavier work higher on the mountain. Here the drag is being operated in tandem with the old Oshkosh blade plow, which is on light duty, and is soon scheduled for replacement.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7891, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
View of snow road, near Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park The steeper and more critical roadway sections of US-441 are benched into the mountainside. It has been found that accumulated snow must be moved completely across the roadway and pushed over the side... That explains the lack of a developed snow berm on the inward side. The outside berm would be even higher than the present 6 to 7 feet if much of the snow did not roll on down the mountainside when it is plowed over. The berm serves the incidental purpose of keeping stray vehicles out of danger.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7881, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Road after plowing, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park When the storm abates and the plows finish clearing the roadway, the surface must be made safe for all traffic. Sanding appears simple, but a high degree of judgment is necessary to determine the proper mix to apply to the road. When the surface is soft, gravel (1/2-inch maximum size) is most effective. On ice, gravel is useless, but sand provides traction. When the road cover is melting, gravel must be used because sand washes away. Calcium and sodium chloride are mixed in varying degrees with the aggregate. In cold weather, the percentage of calcium chloride is increased, and in warmer weather, calcium choloride is not needed. Obviously, sanding isn't as simple as it looks... Sanded road.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7899, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Snow coats rocks and bridge on trail to Chimneys Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow coats rocks and bridge on trail to Chimneys.Snow Scene, II-F-(1)-4734, Physical Facilities - Footlogs and Bridges - Foot trail bridges; footlogs
Plowers plowing the snow road, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park This illustrates another advantage of tandem plowing: Here, the snow is being completely moved across the roadway in two stages.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7888, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Ephraim Bales house covered with snow, Ephraim Bales Place, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Ephraim Bales House; Roaring Fork; Building NO. 135, II-B-(5)-3639, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Historic buildings being preserved
View of snow road, near Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park The storm wasn't all bad, however. The quiet beauty of a burdened fir won't defray expenses, but it can instill warm contentment on a cold day.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7879, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
View of jeep moving in a snow filled road between Indian Gap and Forney Ridge, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Attempt to open up the Clingmans Dome Road from Indian Gap to Forney Ridge...Wanted to check conditions of comfort station. The big V-snowplow could not clear off the sections of frozen snow in drifts up to several feet deep,Clingmans Dome Road, II-R-Maint-7780, Physical Facilities - Roads - Maintenance of Roads
Sanding operations in progress after snow removal, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park When the storm abates and the plows finish clearing the roadway, the surface must be made safe for all traffic. Sanding appears simple, but a high degree of judgment is necessary to determine the proper mix to apply to the road. When the surface is soft, gravel (1/2-inch maximum size) is most effective. On ice, gravel is useless, but sand provides traction. When the road cover is melting, gravel must be used because sand washes away. Calcium and sodium chloride are mixed in varying degrees with the aggregate. In cold weather, the percentage of calcium chloride is increased, and in warmer weather, calcium choloride is not needed. Obviously, sanding isn't as simple as it looks... Sand truck.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7898, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
James R. Reagan place house, Smokemont, North Carolina Great Smoky Mountains National Park James R. Reagan Place House; Smokemont Area, III-B-9210, History - Buildings
View of snow road, near Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Newfound Gap, looking south. The snow berm in the foreground is well above the height of a man.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7878, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Administration Building, Building No. 231, full view of rear, winter with snow on ground Great Smoky Mountains National Park Full view of rear. Winter. Administration Building, Building No. 231, II-B-(1)-1465, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Administrative buildings (ranger stations and outbuildings, warden stations, fire towers, checking stations, Geological Survey gauging stations, possession cabin.
Plowers plowing the snow road, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park After the storm comes the cleanup... At Newfound Gap, parking areas must be opened and roadways widened, because invariably, after a bout with Nature, the sun shines, and hordes of people drive to the top to view the winter spectacle. Grader in use.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7895, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
James R. Reagan place house, Smokemont, North Carolina Great Smoky Mountains National Park James R. Reagan Place House; Smokemont Area, III-B-9208, History - Buildings
Partial removal of snow from road with snow banks on both sides, Newfound Gap, North Carolina, 1960 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Newfound Gap parking area. Southbound parking lane after opening with snowplows. Further snow removal continued to dump snow over downhill wall on left to provide needed parking space. Snow removal report picture.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3809, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Removing snow using bull dozer, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Only a big job would justify moving these loaders 15 miles each way...Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7897, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Snow clings to branches of trees Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow clings to branches of trees.Winter Scene, II-A-MR-4732, Physical Facilities - Minor Structures
Snow covered small house with chimney to right Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Photo of stream covered in snow with mountains in background, Cades Cove, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Cades Cove,Soil & Moisture Project, IV-Z-17279
Ice and snow cover the branches of the trees on the mountain Great Smoky Mountains National Park Ice and snow cover the branches of the trees on the mountain.Typical Winter scene, I-A-Gen-4860, Natural Features - Mountains - General Views
Park headquarters sign covered in snow Great Smoky Mountains National Park Sign-Park Headquarters, II-A-Sign-3409, Physical Facilities - Minor Structures - Signs
View of bride under construction in snow, right bank abutment not installed, Forge Creek, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Reconstruct 2 bridges, Parsons Branch and Anthony Creek Cades Cove, Work Order No. R-23 GRSM. Forge Creek bridge. Bridge decking installed, and portion of wheel guards in place. Backfill at bridge abutments not finished. Completion report photo.Forge Creek Bridge, II-F-(3)-TS-7481, Physical Facilities - Footlogs and Bridges - Truck Trail Bridges- Trail Shelters
High-lift equipment clearing snow off road and parking spaces, Newfound Gap, North Carolina, 1960 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow removal report picture. High-lift equipment widening road and parking spaces at Newfound Gap on March 11th.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3806, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Plowers plowing the snow road, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park The blade plow is used as a supplementary unit at high elevations. It clears the snow from the roadway and puts it in position near the berm for Big John to push on over. In this picture, taken at Newfound Gap, the blade plow is reclearing a one-way roadway section of 4 to 6 inches accumulation. The plows are kept in continual operation during a major storm to keep abreast with the accumulating snow. Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7886, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Wooden structure surrounded and covered in snow, Junglebrook Tub Mill, Cherokee Orchard Road Great Smoky Mountains National Park Building report photo.Junglebrook Tub Mill; Cherokee Orchard Road; Building No. 132, II-B-(5)-3007, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Historic buildings being preserved
James R. Reagan place house, Smokemont, North Carolina Great Smoky Mountains National Park James R. Reagan Place House; Smokemont Area, III-B-9209, History - Buildings
Plowers plowing the snow road, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park These pictures illustrate one advantage of tandem plowing: The workhorse V-Plow, Big John, bulls back the rapidly accumulating snow berm, while a blade plow follows to remove the residue from the roadway to make it safer for normal traffic.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7883, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Snow on mountain Great Smoky Mountains National Park
Front view of building no. 373, covered with snow, bare trees around, Cosby, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Built 1957,Cosby Camptender Quarters; Building No. 373, II-B-(2)-7711, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Quarters
Snow removal using jeep in Cherokee Orchard road, Gatlinburg, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park In the miscellaneous areas around the shops, at Twin Creeks and Cherokee Orchard, at the Visitor Centers, and at headquarters, the jeep is invaluable because of its mobility and flexibility. Here, the snow that fell during the February 18-20 storm is being cleaned from the Cherokee Orchard road. The jeep can efficiently handle snow up to about 12 inches.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7893, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Administration Building, Building No. 231, side view of front porch, taken from entrance path, winter scene with snow on ground Great Smoky Mountains National Park Side view of front porch, taken from entrance path. Winter scene. From practically same point as II-B-(1)-1460. Administration Building, Building No. 231, II-B-(1)-1461, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Administrative buildings (ranger stations and outbuildings, warden stations, fire towers, checking stations, Geological Survey gauging stations, possession cabin.
Snow grader at work, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park At lower elevations, where the accumulations are less. Occasionally a grader is called into duty. It can remove snow efficiently, and is effective by itself with snow berms up to about 36 inches.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7889, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Snow removal in progress, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park These pictures illustrate one advantage of tandem plowing: The workhorse V-Plow, Big John, bulls back the rapidly accumulating snow berm, while a blade plow follows to remove the residue from the roadway to make it safer for normal traffic.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7882, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Dozer pushing 2-8 feet deep snow on Dome road, 1960 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Opening Dome road with D-7 dozer...snow depth: 2-8 feet.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3977, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Oshkosh blade plow, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Storms often occur when large accumulations are recorded at high elevations and up to 6 inches fall on the lower slopes. Such was the case from February 18th to 20th. The drag plow, attached to a stake body dump truck, is effective up to a 6-inch accumulation of snow. It frees the larger blade plows for heavier work higher on the mountain. Here the drag is being operated in tandem with the old Oshkosh blade plow, which is on light duty, and is soon scheduled for replacement.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7892, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Workers adjusting the angle of plow blade, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park The blade angle on a blade plow must be adjusted often to accommodate various snow conditions, and to allow plowing to either side of the roadway.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7887, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Administration Building, Building No. 231, at center, full view, mountains in background, snow on ground Great Smoky Mountains National Park Full view from road. Winter scene. Early picture, evidently taken soon after planting was done. Administration Building, Building No. 231, II-B-(1)-1457, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Administrative buildings (ranger stations and outbuildings, warden stations, fire towers, checking stations, Geological Survey gauging stations, possession cabin.
Shelter with chain link fence for bear protection covered in snow Great Smoky Mountains National Park Shelter showing chain link fencing across front-installed in 1970's as a protection against bears.Trail shelter, II-B(4)TS-17423
View of large wooden barn in snow, Junglebrook House, Cherokee Orchard Road Great Smoky Mountains National Park Building report photo.Junglebrook Barn; Cherokee Orchard Road; Building No. 133, II-B-(5)-3011, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Historic buildings being preserved
Car with snowbanks on left and snow slide on right near Morton Overlook, 1960 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Mountain road, 200 yards south of Morton Overlook. Snowslide on right. Snow removal report picture.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3816, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
View from the east, looking down walkway to front door Great Smoky Mountains National Park View from the east, looking down walkway to front door. A snowy day.Park Headquarters, II-B-(1)-4866, Physical Facilities - Buildings - Administrative buildings (ranger stations and outbuildings; warden stations; fire towers; checking stations; Geological Survey gauging stations; possession cabin
View of snow road, near Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park The steeper and more critical roadway sections of US-441 are benched into the mountainside. It has been found that accumulated snow must be moved completely across the roadway and pushed over the side... That explains the lack of a developed snow berm on the inward side. The outside berm would be even higher than the present 6 to 7 feet if much of the snow did not roll on down the mountainside when it is plowed over. The berm serves the incidental purpose of keeping stray vehicles out of danger.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7880, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Snow covering a mountain scene Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow covers every twig and branch.Mountain Scene in Winter, I-A-Gen-4778, Natural Features - Mountains - General Views
Snow grader at work, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park At lower elevations, where the accumulations are less. Occasionally a grader is called into duty. It can remove snow efficiently, and is effective by itself with snow berms up to about 36 inches.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7890, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
High snow banks next to Highway 441 near Newfound Gap, North Carolina, 1960 Great Smoky Mountains National Park High snow banks of Highway 441, near Newfound Gap, restricts vision of approaching traffic and hampers further snow removal operation. Snow removal report picture.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3805, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Five foot snow depth at Collins Gap, North Carolina, 1960 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow depth at Collins Gap: 5 feet.Snow Removal; 1960, II-R-SR-3976, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Snow removal operations in progress, Newfound Gap, Tennessee Great Smoky Mountains National Park If the amount of snowfall is moderate, the plows can push the berms back sufficiently. Occasionally, after a heavy snowfall, it has been found to be economical to remove the snow with front-end loaders. This equipment is also used to remove extremely large snow berms from along the side of US-441 so that the next storm will not cripple removal operations.Snow Removal; February 1964 Monthly Report, II-R-SR-7896, Physical Facilities - Roads - Snow Removal Operations
Person sitting on rock in the snow at Forney Ridge parking area, mountainous landscape in background Great Smoky Mountains National Park Figure sitting on rock at Forney Ridge parking area. Taken into the sun? Winter scene. Forney Ridge, I-A-FR-277, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Forney Ridge.
Snow Geese, Cape Hatteras National Seashore, North Carolina Kings Mountain National Military Park Cape Hatteras National Seashore Snow Geese
Looking into North Carolina from Andrews Bald, view of snow covered trees, mountains in distance Great Smoky Mountains National Park Looking into North Carolina from Andrews Bald. Andrews Bald, I-D-AB-801, Natural Features - Balds - Andrews Bald.
View of Grouse tracks in snow, circa 1939 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Grouse tracks in snow. Grouse, Tracks, I-E-Bird-873, Natural Features - Fauna - Birds.
View of Grouse tracks in snow, circa 1939 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Grouse tracks in snow. Grouse, Tracks, I-E-Bird-872, Natural Features - Fauna - Birds.
Looking down Luftee Valley from Skyway Drive at snow covered trees and mountains Great Smoky Mountains National Park Looking down Luftee Valley. View from Skyway Drive. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-387, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Winter scene of snow covered trees and ridge along Clingmans Dome Road Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene along Clingmans Dome Road. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-391, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
View of snow covered trees, snow in foreground Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow-covered trees. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-385, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Mountainous landscape, looking down Forney Creek, 1899 Great Smoky Mountains National Park Looking down Forney Creek. Forney Ridge, I-A-FR-278, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Forney Ridge.
Winter scene of snow covered trees and ridge along Clingmans Dome Road Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene of ridge, along Clingmans Dome Road. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-390, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
View of mountainous landscape from Newfound Gap highway, stone railway in foreground Great Smoky Mountains National Park View from Newfound Gap highway. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-404, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Winter scene of curved parking area on mountain road, several cars parked on shoulder Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene, taken at a curved parking area on mountain road. Several cars parked on shoulder. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-382, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Road at center, surrounded by snow covered trees, mountains in distance Great Smoky Mountains National Park Light snow. Road predominates the picture. Mountain Road, I-A-MR-381, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Winter scene at Newfound Gap, mountains in background, man standing on rock wall in left foreground, snow on ground Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene at Newfound Gap. Man standing on rock wall. Newfound Gap, Winter, I-A-NFG-482, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap.
View from Newfound Gap highway, stone railing and snow in foreground Great Smoky Mountains National Park View from Newfound Gap highway. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-407, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Snow covered spruce trees, Mt. LeConte in the distance, from Newfound Gap highway Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow-covered trees. The spruce forest in winter, Mt. LeConte in the distance. Winter scene from Newfound Gap highway. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-386, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Close up view of snow covered trees Great Smoky Mountains National Park Snow-covered trees. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-379, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Winter scene showing curve in road, three people standing on road at left, trees in background Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene, showing road curve. Three figures at left. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-384, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.
Winter scene at Newfound Gap showing snow covered trees and road to Cherokee Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene at Newfound Gap showing road to Cherokee. Newfound Gap, Winter, I-A-NFG-481, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap.
Winter scene from Clingmans Dome Road, snow covered trees in foreground, mountains in distance Great Smoky Mountains National Park Winter scene from Clingmans Dome Road. Mountain Road, Winter, I-A-MR-388, Natural Features - Mountains - Views from Newfound Gap and Clingmans.